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Discussion Starter #1
As this is my first diesel engine car I have been doing some checking on the Diesel Particulate Filter clogging if the car is used for short runs, like the 'school run' for instance, or mainly in the City.

I've read about problems with the Peugeot FAP engine, but they were a couple of years ago.

The 2008 handbook makes reference to a Diesel Additive but doesn't show where this 'additive' is refilled.

It says that if the warning light comes on then the filter is at least 45% blocked and the car should be run for at least 10 minutes in excess of 40mph until the warning light goes off. If it doesn't go off then that is an indication that the additive needs topping up.

If you are doing short runs then how long does it take to clog the DPF?

Can anyone share any information regarding the system in the 2008?......has it been resolved with the 'additive'?

Is it something to be concerned about?...or just something to be aware of?

I was told a new diesel engine was due out in a couple of years, or so, which won't need a DPF.

I'm sure it shouldn't pose a major problem but it would be good for any extra information or experiences.

Al.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I've just come off the phone after talking to a very helpful lady who assured me that it is not a problem, providing you do the occasional longer journey.

She also told me the DPF warning will take some time (like months) before it comes up. It is not something that is in any way a problem but it is something to be aware of.

She has sold dozens of Peugeot diesel cars and only ever had one DPF problem as the lady owner only ever did short trips in her RCZ and had to fetch it in after almost a year. Once it was sorted and explained she never had the problem recur.

She re-assured me that the diesel engine in the 2008 is the most up-to-date and any topping up of the fuel additive should only ever be necessary at the time of the cars regular service.

Any comments?
 

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Al. Sounds about right. The additive is normally in a bladder sack hidden by the fuel tank and the diesel is supplied with a measured dose. The bladder which is best described as a hospital blood bag, sorry to those who are delicate, should last a good 80k miles. I had one leak this year on my wife's car but we made it 650 miles back from scotland and no warning light. Advised by a local dealer it would be ok. Changed under warranty no problem. The additive causes the soot on the particle filter to burn off at a lower temperature and thereby regenerate. The occasional spurt down the motorway should fix that. You get a warning if it needs to regenerate anyway and you have not driven in a way to allow it to do so. People tend to get into issues if they ignore the warnings. Yes I have heard horror stories but these bags and DPF's are on a lot of cars. Mac. oh and mine is a diesel 2008 with the same engine
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's been suggested that I should use BP Ultimate diesel or Shell V-Power Nitro+ diesel as they also have additives to burn cleaner than the standard diesel that you get from Tesco/ASDA petrol stations.

One person told me he had problems with Tesco but hasn't had the DPF problem since he switched to BP Ultimate diesel.

Using these 'special' fuels is going to be more costly but the sort of MPG we should get breaks down the extra cost so as not to be a consideration.

Is using these fuels a good idea?...or even necessary?

Al.
 

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We have a 2.0l Hdi 807 that we have had 9 years.It's lived its life doing short journeys and still only has 55k miles on the clock.It was fine until about 45k miles but since that time has been nothing but problems.After various attempts to regenerate the dpf and clean it using snake oil I gave up recently and had the dpf removed altogether and the car remapped.That has solved the problems and resulted in substantially better performance.

My 207 has never had similar problem but the additive bag did spring a leak once which meant that it had to be replaced at great cost as the eolys fluid is ludicrously expensive.


Fingers crossed that these things are getting better and better over time.
 

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Al, no in my view really not necessary, you are paying extra money for cleaners etc that you already have in your car. Supermarket fuel can be a little suspect as they buy from the cheapest source from memory, but that was some years ago. I tend to stick to normal mainstream BP, Shell, Total etc. and they all tend to have additives in them anyway. I used to add a special cleaner once in a while in older diesels like land rovers but when I moved to a Discovery 3, I to thought I would pay the extra, I soon found it would give me worse fuel consumption on BP ultimate than normal BP. Yes it revved easier but I did not need that. I would say those fuels were designed more for high end sports diesels that rev higher. Your friend was just a likely picking up dirty fuel that caused a problem.

Mac.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi burty and Mac; thank you for that info. I'll stick with a decent branded fuel without the extra oomph offered.

I did see several sites offering DPF removal + remapping but it's probably better to wait until it's out of warranty before indulging in such a move.

Al.
 

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The additive is in a tank under the car. An injector periodically fires a dose of the fluid into the fuel tank and this chemical raises combustion temperatures during the regeneration cycle.

A longer journey now and again won't completely solve the problem. Fundamentally, if you regular journeys of under 7 miles you shouldn't consider a modern diesel as it will eventually compromise the DPF regardless of whether you Chuck in the odd extra motorway blast or not.

The filter deals with particulates and the type of fuel you use won't affect that at all - the laws of physics as matter moves from one state to another govern this, and south of the combustion chamber the detergent chemicals have zero effect.Edited by: Don Bernard
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Hi Don, thank you for that extra info.

I'm thinking we will be keeping out 206 a little longer for short local trips like the school run and the weekly visit to Tesco.

The 206 will also be handy for the journey to/from and weeks parking at the airport for the holidays whilst we leave our 2008 tucked-up at home in our garage.

Al.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Funnily enough that's the same link I posted on the Qashqai Club thread that was running regarding fuels to use.

I posed the question that maybe it would be better to use BP Ultimate or Shell and one member replied:



Not really - you'd have to analyse the technical stats of each fuel to see what it has. Been googling to see if I could find a comparison, which I couldn't, but I did find an article about ash accumulation in diesels which says :

<div style="font-size: 12.222222328186035px; line-height: 17.77777862548828px; : rgb251, 251, 253;">
<div style="font-size: 12.222222328186035px; line-height: 17.77777862548828px; : rgb251, 251, 253;">Ash accumulation in the DPF increases with oil consumption and lubricant ash content, as lubricant additives are generally the largest source of ash
<div style="font-size: 12.222222328186035px; line-height: 17.77777862548828px; : rgb251, 251, 253;">
<div style="font-size: 12.222222328186035px; line-height: 17.77777862548828px; : rgb251, 251, 253;">Some of these premium fuels have more lubricants, so possibly would give more ash?
<div style="font-size: 12.222222328186035px; line-height: 17.77777862548828px; : rgb251, 251, 253;">
<div style="font-size: 12.222222328186035px; line-height: 17.77777862548828px; : rgb251, 251, 253;">http://www.dieselnet.com/tech/dpf_ash.php
<div style="font-size: 12.222222328186035px; line-height: 17.77777862548828px; : rgb251, 251, 253;">

<div style="font-size: 12.222222328186035px; line-height: 17.77777862548828px; : rgb251, 251, 253;">

<div style="font-size: 12.222222328186035px; line-height: 17.77777862548828px; : rgb251, 251, 253;">

<div style=": rgb251, 251, 253;">Trouble is that some of these statistics are achieved by
analyzing large engines ie: lorries etc that do high mileages.

<div style=": rgb251, 251, 253;">


<div style=": rgb251, 251, 253;">It really seems confusing when you start to think about it. I guess the thing to do is use it as we have been and see if our usage needs to be modified to suit a modern day diesel.

<div style=": rgb251, 251, 253;">


<div style=": rgb251, 251, 253;">Oh, yes...I always park away from the front of Tesco's and walk; but there's always someone parked next to me when I come out!!


<div style=": rgb251, 251, 253;">


<div style=": rgb251, 251, 253;">Al.
 

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Mines going to be s low miler so went for the petrol. It's nearly 150kg lighter as well, all of it from over the front wheels, and feels the better for it, although the diesel if far from being a warthog in the corners.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Trouble is you can't get the Petrol in an Automatic and my wife doesn't like driving Manual cars.

Thankfully her 206 is an auto (Petrol) so no problem there.

Happy days.


Al.




Edited by: allan40alt
 

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Close to the manifold - it needs to be kept hot.
 

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2008 - 1.6HDI automatic...If the DPF is regenerating at 2000rpm usually, the EGS version have a changed software for this... The regeneration is made in automatic gear, you will see that the rpm is going higher at shifting up...
At these hot days, the regeneration is not a problem now...But will be a problem in winter...
WHY TO DRIVE MINIMUM 15km?
Because the regeneration is started at engine temp around 90-95 degrees...in hot days, you get this temp very fast, but in winter you don't...The ash deposited in DPF in winter will become wet at engine stop, and will solidify...If you don't drive enough in winter to get the engine at proper temp, there will be a problem, as the ash is transforming in permanent stone-like deposit.

Another problem regarding the petrol/diesel:
- the standard diesel is recommended in usual travels, as all the "improoved" diesel contains substances that generate more ash.
- once at7-8 full tanks is recommended one full with Super Diesel, in order to clean the sparkles/injection. Not EVERY TIME !
- do not use additional products for diesel improvement...80% of them are made without ash check, and is risky (80% are made in Turkey or China, extreme poor quality) (even in Romania we have PETROMIDIA local producer - a little expensive one, that is 100% checked for ash and other problems, and is fine, but we use it only at 10 full tanks).

Remember :
- if DPF collapses without any chance of regen, and you have no more warranty, just remove it...but first, must suppress the sensors for DPF using a OBD programmer...if you dont, you will buy a new DPF !

Hope this help you in keeping a good running car.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
We can't remove the DPF here as it is part of the vehicle specification and will be tested at the MOT (when applicable) to ensure it is working correctly.

Removing it would mean an MOT failure.
 
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